Cigarette butts

The most commonly found piece of trash on beaches isn’t plastic bags or straws. It’s even smaller and contains dozens of dangerous chemicals.

Cigarette butts

The most commonly found piece of trash on beaches isn’t plastic bags or straws. It’s even smaller and contains dozens of dangerous chemicals.

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SOCIAL STREAM

Plastic bags and straws get all the press, but cigarette butts are actually the most littered item — and they contain toxic chemicals that threaten wildlife and water. Find out more... ... See MoreSee Less

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